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English Spelling Rules and Generalizations Part 1

English Spelling Rules and Generalizations Part 1

English Spelling Rules and Generalizations Part 1 150 150 fisherhilladmin

English Spelling Rules and Generalizations

Part 1

 Consonants

There are 26 letters in the English alphabet. Twenty-one of those letters are consonants and the other five are vowels. The letters a, e, i, o and u are vowels. The consonants make one sound except for c, g, and s.

The letter c is the first choice for the /k/ sound at the beginning of a word.

The letter c has the soft sound /s/ when followed by e, i or y. For examply city, rice, cyclone.

The letter g has the soft sound /j/ when followed by e, i, or y. For example: gentle, gym, fringe.

The letter s makes the /s/ sound as in snake. It can also sound like the letter z at the end of many words. For example: his, dogs, brothers.

The letter q is always followed by a u and one or more vowels. For example: quit, quack, queen.

The lettes v, x, and w are never doubled.

Short Vowel Rule

The five vowel letters each make more than one sound. They each make is called a short vowel sound. Short vowel a says /a/ as in cat. Short vowel e says /e/ as in pen. Short vowel i says /i/ as in pig. Short vowel o says /o/ as in hot and short vowel u says /u/ as in cup.

Double the final f, s, z, or l in short words after a single vowel. For example: huff, pass, buzz, hill.

Use the spelling ck to spell the /k/ sound after a short vowel. For example: snack, stick, lock.

Use the letter k to spell the /k/ sound after a consonant, a long vowel or a double vowel. For example: sink, chunk, hike, peak, soak.

Use the spelling tch to spell the /ch/ sound after a short vowel. For example: catch, pitch, notch, clutch.

Use the spelling ch to spell the /ch/ sound after a consonant or a double vowel. For example: bunch, porch, peach, coach.

Use the letters dge to spell the /j/ sound after a short vowel. Examples: badge, fudge, bridge, lodge.

Use the letters ge to spell the /j/ sound after a double vowel or a consonant. For example: gorge, gouge, plunge.

The above spelling rules and generalizations are introduced and practiced in our series English Reading and Spelling for the Spanish Speaker.

 

English Reading and Spelling for the Spanish Speaker        English Reading and Spelling for the Spanish Speaker Book 2English Reading and Spelling for the Spanish Speaker Book 3English Reading and Spelling for the Spanish Speaker Book 4English Reading and Spelling for the Spanish Speaker Book 5English Reading and Spelling for the Spanish Speaker Book 6

Visit our website at www.Fisher-Hill.com to learn more about this series for Spanish Speaking teens and adults.

 

 

 

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